Cell phone text, voice messages submitted as evidence in Trinidad and Tobago Court for first time

Text messages, pictures and voice mail stored on a cell phone was submitted as evidence in a Trinidad and Tobago court for the first time on Wednesday January 16th, 2008.

The court case is against a man accused of murder in a preliminary inquiry being held at the Port-of-Spain Eighth Magistrates’ Court. The victim’s girlfriend Nokia’s cell phone contained the voice messages from the accused. According to the Newsday article :

Three voice messages, left on the Nokia phone of the victim’s girlfriend by the accused, were extracted by police from the phone’s SIM card using a special software called Pure Voice.

The messages were tendered into evidence in the Port-of-Spain Eighth Magistrates’ Court as audio files saved on a CD-ROM. Also on the CD-ROM were seven digital photographs, as well as a special forensics report of the phone compiled using Cell DEK software.

The phone had initially been examined by PC Daniel Hernandez, of the Analysis Unit of the Homicide Bureau and yesterday he told the court how he used special software to extract the three messages and then saved them on a CD-ROM.
Yesterday also marked another first, with the court being shown 30 text messages from the phone of Ash, which was also extracted from her Nokia bmobile phone using special software.

Found a link for Logicube CellDek which I believe was used for the forensics report for the cell phone ; although a link to Pure Voice which I believe is from Qualcomm is hard to find.

3 thoughts on “Cell phone text, voice messages submitted as evidence in Trinidad and Tobago Court for first time”

  1. You can’t. But are you sure PureVoice is software and not hardware ? You could conceivably insert the SIM into a device which would then be able to access the user’s voicemail and digitally record it…

    It sounds like either the police are disseminating misinformation, or the newspapers muddled up the facts again.

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